Friday, August 25, 2017

Corey's Fall 2017 Presentations on Librarianship

I wanted to share out some of the presentations I am working on this fall. Should be a busy term for sure. I am also working on getting some articles out as well. Mostly these will be focused on the role of public service and librarianship, especially with the viewpoint of our bookless "library of the future" at Kresge Library Services at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan. While the focus might be on business libraries, I believe that this is applicable to all academic libraries. If you have any thoughts, comments, or encouragement, please drop me a note at cseeman@umich.edu.

Some last day shots - Kresge Business Administration Library - July 18, 2014

Charleston Conference

I have a number of sessions at the fantastic Charleston Conference this November.

History Has Its Eyes on You: Lighthouses and Libraries Weathering Storms of Change - or is being the Public Good Good Enough?


For hundreds of years, the United States has been protected by two venerable institutions. Lighthouses have served as a beacon on the shores to guide ships carrying both people and cargo to a safe harbor. Libraries have served as a beacon to guide people to books, magazines, journals, reference works, recordings and other media for enlightenment, education and enjoyment. Both lighthouses and libraries have enjoyed their status as 'public goods' with little question in regards to the rationale for funding and support. Since most ships have navigation systems and we have all library items on our smartphone (we do right???), questions are being asked about the future of these two beacons.

Change impacting both lighthouses and libraries are remarkably similar. With automation and electrification, lighthouses transitioned to low-maintenance entities and many have been turned into historical museums across the country. Libraries have seen tremendous changes as collections became increasingly electronic over the past two years. The value proposition libraries play on campuses has changed - along with their ability to support community members in the present and many years in the future. While 'what's past is prologue' helps set the scene, the reality laid before both is to adapt or 'wither away on the vine.'

In this presentation, we will look at the parallel paths taken by both lighthouses and libraries in fulfilling their self-mandated missions. To that end, we will look more closely at the meaning of a 'public good' and the demands that librarians have in supporting both current use and future use of collections as we balance between community needs and aspirations. How librarians (and lighthouse keepers) face the coming storm will have a tremendous impact on future generations of our community members.

What's Past Is Possible: Opportunities and Perspectives for Library Alumni Resources


Presentation with Jo-Anne Hogan (MLIS, Publisher, Business for ProQuest)

When considering the theme "What's Past is Prologue," there might not be a better application than to think of former students at our colleges and universities. As they venture off into the role of campus alumni, their information needs become complicated when they lose access to the wealth of electronic resources that are available at most campuses. Having resources at hand while a student is wonderful, but the grim reality of having little available to them upon graduation can be a bit of a let down. A growing number of colleges and universities are offering alumni a suite of electronic resources that are either bundled as part of their existing package, negotiated or purchased separately. The value to the vendor may be as an additional revenue line or exposure to a larger population. This might be especially true in business where the need for information and news resources is ongoing. The value to the library may be as a connection to a mission of lifelong learning that can partner with other aspects of the school. Even in a time of tight resource budgets, this can be a good investment by the library.

Kresge Library Services (Michigan) and ProQuest are no strangers to alumni resources. Kresge Library Services (of the Ross School of Business) has long been providing resources to alumni and is featured as an key lifelong learning element of the school. ProQuest has provided a number of alumni packages to libraries over the years as well. In this presentation, we will hear from a library and a vendor in how they approach alumni researchers, resources and what opportunities they provide to these organizations.


Critical business collections: Examining key issues using a social justice lens

Panel discussion with:
  • Heather Howard, Assistant Professor of Library Science & Business Information Specialist, Parrish Library of Management & Economics, Purdue University Libraries
  • Katherine Macy, Business Librarian, IUPUI
  • Corey Seeman, Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan
  • Alyson Vaalar, Business Librarian, Texas A&M
All academic librarians perform a balancing act between the needs of patrons, licensing restrictions, and the missions of our libraries. As part of the work to develop our campus collections, academic business librarians work with both schools and commercial vendors to provide resources that our business students and faculty require. Business publishers charge academic customers pennies on the dollar for access, but are likely to seek protections for their intellectual content by placing usage restrictions that run counter to what librarians would prefer. This can cause difficulties for librarians in serving their unique populations. This also can run counter to the central principals of “Critical Librarianship”, which is based on a foundation of social justice, the belief that everyone deserves equal opportunities and basic economic, political, and social rights. Balancing the needs of the publishers and business school communities with the principals of critical librarianship is a great challenge for everyone who serves these communities. Business librarians from across the US will explore ways in which collections and critical librarianship collide. Topics to be covered include critical cataloging, the effects of database licenses on the intersection of theoretical academic work and practical business activities, challenges faced by public institutions supporting community entrepreneurs, and how the integration of critical pedagogy with information and data literacies can bring awareness to problems within current collections such as access to information, issues in data collection, and information creation. Through discussion, we hope to provide insight to ways in which libraries, as intermediaries between patrons and vendors, can help address these difficult problems.
November 21-22, 2017
Indian Institute of Management - Ahmedabad, India
Conference Theme: "Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Leadership: The Evolving Role of Business Libraries"

I am super excited to be traveling to India this fall for the 3rd Global Conference on Emerging Trends for Business Librarianship. Could not pass up the opportunity to explore S. R. Ranganathan's Laws, especially as they might be applied to the libraries of the future. This will (hopefully) be worked on for publication in 2018.


Save the Time of the Reader: Using S. R. Ranganathan's Fourth Law to Build the Business Library of the Future
S. R. Ranganathan's monumental 1931 work The Five Laws of Library Science remains one of the most powerful and inspirational works in our field. Even though he might not have envisioned the digital library of today, his work remains a beacon that guides librarians into a new world order. The fourth law, "save the time of the reader," captures the image and primary goal of the library of the future. This stands as a critical principle for the future of libraries, especially those supporting business.

Ranganathan's Fourth Law is one that often focuses on technical services, especially in the context of creating catalogs and the organization of information. Through these resources, we create users who are more self-sufficient in finding what they need. Without these resources, our users wouldn't be able find any books or articles. While the creation of self-service tools like catalogs are a significant investment that libraries make to save the time of our users, they are by no means perfect. We organize information the way that we understand it. The self-service library user is successful when he or she searches search for books or data in the same descriptive conventions that libraries use. But does it work for business researchers, especially for those conducting entrepreneurial research? Does their visioning of information align with the way that we structure it in our physical and digital libraries? Often, the answer is no.

A better way to save the time of the reader is through direct support and assistance. Business researchers live with the appearance of abundance of information, yet become frustrated when their desired items appear elusive. This is especially true for entrepreneurial researchers who are working in new and narrow markets that are not as well defined or described. This presentation will explore S.R. Ranganathan's fourth law re-envisioned to focus on public or reference services to meet the needs of the business and entrepreneurial researcher. This presentation will showcase how business libraries can save the time of our researchers by being service-oriented and responsive to their research needs. Through a service-orientation, we can better understand our users and, in turn, help them find the information and works they need. Through this service-orientation, we can build the library of the future that business researchers and entrepreneurs need.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Gildy's Water Problem (The Great Gildersleeve from October 24, 1943)

Every so often I will try to share an episode from Old Time Radio that is personally relevant in my life or that I really enjoy.  I have tried to mostly do this around series (lighthouses, Christmas, etc.), but every so often you have a bump in the road that knocks you off your feet.  For many of us that live in more rural parts of Michigan, we rely on wells to get water into our houses.  And we have had the same well at our house since it was built in the late 1970s...and it just gave out yesterday.  We noticed some cloudy water and then the top of the well started spraying water...so they tried to fix, but our pipes were shot.  No water :( - hopefully fixed this week.  So when I am thinking about those in the water biz - I am thinking of one of the great characters of radio - Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve, Water Commissioner in the town of Summerfield.

Buffalo Bayou Park Cistern Tour - Buffalo Bayou Park (Houston, Texas - July 20, 2017)
Buffalo Bayou Park Cistern (source for Houston Public Water from 1926 through 2007) - Buffalo Bayou Park (Houston, Texas - July 20, 2017)

The Great Gildersleeve is not only a great radio comedy, it has two aspects that really makes it a series way ahead of their time.  First, it was a spin-off program, having had its main character originally on a different series.  In this instance, the main character of Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve was originally on the Fibber McGee and Molly show. According to the Wikipedia entry (please see the link below), the character was introduced on October 3, 1939 (my birthday - not year!).  The Great Gildersleeve debuted on the NBC Network on August 31, 1941.  Second, the actor to play Gildersleeve (or Gildy) was replaced after a contract dispute.  Harold Peary originated the role and played Gildy until a contract dispute moved him off the show.  He was replaced by Willard Waterman in September 1950. Harold Peary would star in the The Harold Peary Show, often known as Honest Harold.

The Great Gildersleeve is the story of Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve - played by Harold Peary.  Gildy is the self-important Water Commissioner in their town of Summerfield.  A bachelor who was constantly on the look for that someone special, he lived in a house with his niece, Marjorie (played by radio great Lurene Tuttle) and nephew, Leroy (played by child voice star Walter Tetley).  They are joined by Birdie (played by Lillian Randolph) as housekeeper and cook at the home.  One of Gildy's great nemeses is Judge Hooker, who plays a nearly constant foil for whatever they are trying to do.  I have gone hot and cold on Gildersleeve over the years, but the more I listen to these episodes, the more I like them.  I love hearing the Kraft ads (from the early years) and I am trying to listen to more of them.

On October 24th, 1943, the episode broadcast over the NBC Radio Network involved Gildy's job as the Water Commissioner in Summerfield.  His nephew Leroy has to write an essay about what his uncle does so they travel to the office on Saturday to get a tour.  While there, they learn of complaints about the water pressure.  Being a good Water Commissioner, Gildersleeve calls over to the reservoir and talks to Charlie the engineer there and tells him to increase the pressure.  Turns out there is a problem with the "snifter valve" and the pressure is low because it needs to be replaced.  When Gildy insists that he increases pressure (slowly), the valve does indeed break....and Summerfield instantly becomes a dry town!  Like so many instances, it is an issue of deferred maintenance.  I hope you enjoy this episode from October 24th, 1943 (BTW - a time when our President was actually fighting Nazis).

October 24, 1943 (The Waterworks Break Down or Low Water)




Here are some links to programs relating to Old Time Radio and The Great Gildersleve:

Saturday, July 15, 2017

American History on Old Time Radio: Aaron Burr on Cavalcade of America & Weird Circle

A few days ago, I highlighted some episodes from Cavalcade of America that told the story of Alexander Hamilton.  Now, I think it makes sense to share some episodes featured the man that did him in....Aaron Burr.  This is the second episode in my American History series on Old Time Radio and will head on from here.  It is a topic that I am interested in and will share more episodes down the road.  I am focusing on Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton - whose duel 213 years ago this week ended the life of Hamilton and set Burr down a path of destruction that is showcased in these two programs.  

Trinity Church (New York City) - February 17, 2017

Alexander Hamilton's Final Resting Place - Trinity Church (New York City) - February 17, 2017

The Cavalcade of America is a great series sponsored by DuPont.  The purpose of the program has been one of great study and I am definitely glad that I have a few episodes to talk about it.  The long-running show ran from 1935 to 1953 and then had a second life on television.  Starting first on the CBS Network, it moved to NBC in 1939.  This 30 minute program provided a great platform to showcase some of the lesser known incidents and people who made the country great.  Not only was this series a great source of historical dramas, there were numerous fictional stories brought in as well.  From the Internet Archive page (see link below),  "The company's motto, 'Maker of better things for better living through chemistry,' was read at the beginning of each program, and the dramas emphasized humanitarian progress, particularly improvements in the lives of women, often through technological innovation."

On May 12th, 1941, Cavalcade featured the story of Burr's daughter, in an episode aptly named "Theodosia Burr". Theodosia Burr was the devoted daughter to Aaron Burr and his wife, Theodosia Bartow Burr, who was formerly married to a British officer. The mother died with Theodosia was only 11. Theodosia was also have a tragically short life, being lost at sea in 1813. Theodosia was married to the governor of South Carolina, Joseph Alston who died shortly thereafter.
This episode follows her role as a dutiful daughter and political peace-broker (when she could) between her father and Alexander Hamilton.  The episode features Ann Starrett as Theodosia Burr and also stars Alfred Shirley, Agnes Moorehead, Ray Collins, Edwin Jerome, William Johnstone, among others.

Theodosia Burr (May 12, 1941)



The Weird Circle is a great series - and honestly, it is amazing that I have never showcased it before.  The series ran from 1943 through 1945 and featured 30 minute adaptations of stories, many were of the supernatural or fantasy genre.  Many famous stories were included in this series, including those from authors Robert Lewis Stevenson, Victor Hugo, Edgar Alan Poe, Charlotte Brontë and many others from the Victorian era.  These are very great stories, though they tend to over-play their part.  Still, these represent some of the most famous stories in English Literature.

On September 30th, 1943, The Weird Circle produced a dramatization of Edward Everett Hale's "The Man Without a County."  This story was first published in the December 1863 edition of The Atlantic and it told the story of Philip Nolan, an American officer who renounced his country during a trial for treason stemming from his connection to Aaron Burr.  During Nolan's trial, he shouts "I wish I may never hear of the United States again!" The judge grants his wish - and he spends his life in exile.  You can read the original Edward Everett Hale story here (from the Atlantic site) or from here (at Cornell University and the University of Michigan's Making of America site).

Man Without a Country (September 30, 1943)




I hope you enjoy these episodes and this new series coming your way.  

Here are some links to programs relating to Old Time Radio and Cavalcade of America:
Here are some links to programs relating to The Weird Circle:

Here are some of my other blog entries relating to Old Time Radio

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

American History on Old Time Radio: Alexander Hamilton on Cavalcade of America

It has been a long time since I have shared some recordings from Old Time Radio, but I wanted to use the anniversary of Alexander Hamilton's death (on July 12, 1804) to showcase a few episodes relating to one our Founding Fathers.  I have pulled together a few episodes that showcase the biography of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr.  I have wanted to do this since seeing the Musical Hamilton (totally brilliant) and visited a number of Alexander Hamilton historic sights in New York City when I was there in February.

I will try to get these posted this week as we think about the duel and the death of Alexander Hamilton 213 years ago this week.  I will use this to start a series on American History on Old Time Radio - which should be fun (at least for me).  I have some more series to get building up over the next couple of months - hopefully you like them also.


Alexander Hamilton Statue in Central Park (New York City) - February 18, 2017

Alexander Hamilton Statue in Central Park (New York City) - February 18, 2017

The Cavalcade of America is a great series sponsored by DuPont.  The purpose of the program has been one of great study and I am definitely glad that I have a few episodes to talk about it.  The long-running show ran from 1935 to 1953 and then had a second life on television.  Starting first on the CBS Network, it moved to NBC in 1939.  This 30 minute program provided a great platform to showcase some of the lesser known incidents and people who made the country great.  Not only was this series a great source of historical dramas, there were numerous fictional stories brought in as well.  From the Internet Archive page (see link below),  "The company's motto, 'Maker of better things for better living through chemistry,' was read at the beginning of each program, and the dramas emphasized humanitarian progress, particularly improvements in the lives of women, often through technological innovation."

Cavalcade had two episodes that feature Alexander Hamilton - and both are really fantastic.  I am going to list them in the order in which they cover his life, not their broadcast dates.

"Ready On The Right" was featured on Cavalcade on October 21, 1952, and starred Jackie Cooper in the role of Alexander Hamilton.  This story focused on Hamilton's service as General Washington's Aide de Campe while trying to get a field command.  He would finally get his command just prior to the Battle of Yorktown and was instrumental in the victory over the British troops in the decisive battle of the Revolutionary War.  Also staring in this episode was Edwin Jerome, Rosemary Rice, Arnold Moss, Lon Clark, and Staats Cotsworth (who also starred as Casey, Crime Photographer).

Ready on the Right (October 21, 1952)



"The Gentleman From The Islands" was featured over ten years earlier on this long running program and provided a very nice dramatization of the events leading up to Hamilton's duel with Aaron Burr. The episode features Alfred Lunt in the role of Alexander Hamilton who provides a very confident voice to the part. Also featured in the cast are Edwin Jerome, Ted Jewett, Karl Swenson, James McCallion, Frank Readick, Kenny Delmar, Will Geer, Arlene Francis, with announcing by Bud Collyer (who prominently played Superman for many a year on radio).

The Gentleman From The Islands (July 6, 1942)



I hope you enjoy these episodes and this new series coming your way.  

Here are some links to programs relating to Old Time Radio and Cavalcade of America:
Here are some of my other blog entries relating to Old Time Radio

Sunday, February 12, 2017

African Americans on Old Time Radio: AFRS Jubilee on Valentine's Day with Cab Calloway (1944)

For my sixth entry African Americans on Old Time Radio, I am showcasing a program that originated from the War Department during World War II.  It is a program that had crossed my field if vision from time to time, but I never really trying to learn more about it until this series.  But once I did....how to put it...wow! Actually, that would be WOW!  This great series came from the Armed Forces Radio Services of the War Department to provide entertainment for African American troops during the war.  

This year to celebrate National African American History Month in February, I am going highlight a new series on my blog.  This year, I will feature African Americans during the Golden Age of Radio - or Old Time Radio - during the 1930s through the 1950s.  I wanted to start this blog last year, but alas...better late than never.  I hope to have a great assortment of programs that showcase the great contributions of African Americans in mainstream radio when Jim Crow laws, segregation and discrimination were regular obstacles facing artists of color.


National Seabee Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, Virginia) - August 1, 2015


National Seabee Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, Virginia) - August 1, 2015


Jubilee is a tremendous series that was produced by the Armed Forces Radio Services (AFRS) to entertain African American troops serving in the military, especially overseas.  Fans of Old Time Radio owe a great deal to the AFRS.  Many of the recordings that we can listen to and share are from transcription albums purchased by the AFRS for entertaining the troops.  In the process, these all became government documents, which essentially, can be shared freely to everyone.  In addition to the series that they selected from the major networks, there were a few series that they produced and recorded.  One was called Command Performance (which I featured here to celebrate Bing Crosby's Christmas shows) and was a variety show featuring the leading radio and entertainment stars of the day.  The other is Jubilee, that we are showcasing today.  It ran from 1942 to 1949, and again from 1952 to 1953 during the Korean War.  Many of the early episodes were hosted by Ernest “Bubbles” Whitman and were mostly recorded before a live audience in Hollywood. Whitman loved saying words backwards, which is why the history below is called Eelibuj. Most of the guests on each show were African Americans and included Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, among others.

For the Valentine's Day episode in 1944, Jubilee featured an amazing program (and one of a few I am hoping to showcase over the next few weeks). The cast (in addition to Whitman) is simply amazing. Cab Calloway and his Orchestra play the great song "We, The Cats, Shall Hep You." Nat King Cole performs as a trio with Oscar Moore and Johnny Miller. George Burns and Gracie Allen did a skit at the end of the half hour program. And one other group performed, and they are tied to the picture above. A group called the Four Seabees performed. The Seabees are members of the United States Naval Construction Forces (NCF). Their name comes from the initials of "Construction Battalion" - CB (or See Bee). The four Seabees turned musicians were: Seaman First Class Ernie Henderson, Percy Heal, Paul C. Richards, and Will Dakota. Their motto "Can Do!" definitely applies to this group and comes into play during the show.  This amazing program features some outstanding musicians and actors and does a fantastic job of preserving these wonderful performances.

I hope you enjoy these episodes.


African Americans on Old Time Radio:

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

African Americans on Old Time Radio: Singer Meredith Howard on Pete Kelly's Blues (1951)

For my fifth entry African Americans on Old Time Radio, I am showcasing a program that was a summer replacement series in 1951.  The star was Jack Webb, who two years earlier introduced the gritty reality of Dragnet to people all over the country.  In this series, Jack Webb introduced America to another passion of his, Jazz.  Playing a key role in this series was a young African American singer named Meredith Howard.  Unlike the roles played by Eddie Anderson and Lillian Randolph, Meredith Howard played a singer in 1920s Kansas City who had a solo with each show.

This year to celebrate National African American History Month in February, I am going highlight a new series on my blog.  This year, I will feature African Americans during the Golden Age of Radio - or Old Time Radio - during the 1930s through the 1950s.  I wanted to start this blog last year, but alas...better late than never.  I hope to have a great assortment of programs that showcase the great contributions of African Americans in mainstream radio when Jim Crow laws, segregation and discrimination were regular obstacles facing artists of color.

Visit to Old U.S. Mint (New Orleans, Louisisana)

Visit to Old U.S. Mint (New Orleans, Louisiana) - 2013 - There is a record in this story...honest!

Pete Kelly's Blues was a brief summer replacement series on NBC that was produced and starred Dragnet actor Jack Webb.  It only ran during the summer of 1951 and was not picked up for a permanent show.  However, it did become a television show and movie of the same name later in the 1950s.  Webb played Pete Kelly, a clarinet player who often finds himself in trouble in the rough and tumble world of musicians and speakeasies during the Prohibition Era.  Meredith Howard played Maggie Jackson, a local singer who not only is written into the stories, but also gets to perform in each episode.  The role of Pete Kelly was much like the role Jack Webb played in the great series Pat Novak, For Hire, which shared Webb and writer Richard Breen who worked on the new series.  He was a musician who played from late at night to early in the morning.  Furthermore, like Pat Novak, trouble found him!  And while this series was the confluence of great radio producers, actors and musicians, the star we want to focus on is Meredith Howard.  Towards the end of this short run, the Los Angeles Sentinel, a newspaper for the African American community, published this profile of the young singer and how she got the part on this program.

How A Lass Tagged Meredith Becomes A Chirper - Maggie
Los Angeles Sentinel, September 20, 1951, page B3
Twenty-one year old Meredith Howard, who plays the role of blues singer Maggie Jackson on NBC's "Pete Kelly's Blues," is still walking in a daze.  In just a few short weeks she jumped from being a student in a Los Angeles trade school to feature billing on the NBC radio shows and star st status on Capital records - and all because Jack Webb once heard her sing two years ago.
It was back in 1949 during Alumni Week at Belmont High School, Meredith, a senior student, sang a few numbers in the school's "Hi-Jinks" production.  Emceeing the show was Jack Webb, Belmont alumni and rising young radio star.  The two met very briefly and that was it, or so it seemed.  When two years later, in 1951, Webb was searching for a genuinely different voice to play the speakeasy blue singer on his "Pete Kelly's Blues," series, he recalled the young girl he'd heard at Belmont high, Webb tracked her down, offered her the radio job and arranged for her to cut some sides for Capital with the "Pete Kelly and his Big Seven" combo and now there seems to be no telling just how high the girl with rocket.
Her brother, Paul White, is also in show business.  He's a dancer in the Ted Lewis aggregation and does the famous "Me and My Shadow," dance with the veteran showman.  In fact it was because of Paul, that the Jackson family left New York for California in 1937.  Paul, then a very young boy, was signed to a Universal Pictures contract and worked in films for three years.
Meredith a big girl of 5' 5" and 163 lbs., says she may finally have the secret of losing weight.  "Just get a sudden phone call from Jack Webb, jump into a whirl of rehearsing, singing, acting, recording, then stay up all night, wondering how it all came about."
Jack Webb's love for jazz was clear in this short-lived series.  Each episode had a few songs that makes listening to the episode a real joy if you love the music of the twenties.  The opening was really great as well:
This one's about Pete Kelly.

It's about the world he goes around in. It's about the big music, and the big trouble, and the big twenties. So when they ask you, tell 'em this one's about the blues. Pete Kelly's blues.
When Pete Kelly and his band start recording a few songs, they found themselves at a recording study where people record music or personal messages for 'family back home.' That is where Pete Kelly finds himself mixed up in a crime...again.  Turns out that the cylinders can be used multiple times, which means that some incriminating evidence might be out there.  When a woman named Zelda shows up and stops him from going into the studio, the adventure begins. Zelda is asking Pete to get back a recording from the studio.  Starting at 16 minutes into this episode, Meredith Howard sings a great song about Fat Annie's, the bar across the river on the Kansas side.  If you like the combination of jazz and crime stories, this is a good series for you!  I hope you enjoy.

Zelda (Pete Kelly's Blues - September 5, 1951)


African Americans on Old Time Radio:

Monday, February 6, 2017

African Americans on Old Time Radio: New World A Coming on Life Behind Newspaper Headlines (1944)

In my fourth entry in my African Americans on Old Time Radio, I want to share a program that was broadcast over WMCA in New York City in the 1940s to showcase the contributions of that community in broader society.  Over the last few episodes, we have heard representations of African American actors in service roles like valets and house-keepers.  But thanks to this great series from Roi Ottley, we hear a different story over the radio in the 1940s to showcase the contributions of African Americans in all areas of society.  As a personal reference, I remember always looking at the WMCA radio transmitter building near the New Jersey Turnpike on the Belleville Turnpike in the wetlands of Northern Jersey.

This year to celebrate National African American History Month in February, I am going highlight a new series on my blog.  This year, I will feature African Americans during the Golden Age of Radio - or Old Time Radio - during the 1930s through the 1950s.  I wanted to start this blog last year, but alas...better late than never.  I hope to have a great assortment of programs that showcase the great contributions of African Americans in mainstream radio when Jim Crow laws, segregation and discrimination were regular obstacles facing artists of color.

Newspapers

Newspapers in the library - November 2008 (University of Michigan)

New World A Coming was a a ground breaking book by Roi Ottley in 1943.  Ottley was a journalist who wrote for the Amsterdam News in the 1930s, where he gained a great understanding of the African American Community in New York, especially Harlem.  He went to St. Bonaventure University before transferring to the University of Michigan where he studied journalism (Go Blue!)  In 1943, Ottley wrote New World A-Coming, and provided an overview of life in Harlem from the 1920s and 30s.  The book became a best seller and won the Peabody Award.  The year after the book came out, WMCA in New York City produced a series with Ottley as the writer to share these stories to an even broader audience.  The Amsterdam News would report the following story after the first episode aired:

"A New World" Holds Premier
S.W. Garlington, New York Amsterdam News (March 11, 1944), page 1
"With the sweeping fury of a resurrection - a new world is coming!"  With this announcement last Sunday over WMCA the premier of the radio program "New World A-Coming" was introduced to the audience of the world's leading independent radio station.  As the music started, one was reminded of "Mood Indigo," but instead it was "New World A-Coming," written by Duke Ellington for the series.
The program was both entertaining and informative.  Even more, it did not pull punches in dramatizing injustices to the Negro and suggested a square deal on all fronts.
Canada Lee, famous actor, served as narrator, the student orchestra furnished the music and a host of actors relayed the various stories - bits of Americana one never seen in the daily press.
The City-Wide Citizens Community on Harlem sponsored the program - to run for 26 weeks - in hope of making democracy less of a dream and more of a reality.  Columnist Dorothy Norman spoke for the committee.  Roi Ottley, former Amsterdam-News staff writer and author of the best-selling NEW WORLD A-COMING, from which the series is based, also spoke.
Each Sunday, at 3:03 p. m., for the next 25 weeks.  WMCA and the City-Wide Citizens Committee on Harlem and accompanying artists will present to the radio world a 27-minute program of entertainment and information, designed to reassure the fact that A NEW WORLD IS COMING.
On April 23, 1944, the episode that I am featuring was first aired.  Called "The Story Behind The Headline In The Negro Press", it showcased the need and function of the 200 or so African American newspapers across the country.  As pointed out in this episode, while many members of the African American community read the main daily newspapers for their cities, they also read the "Negro Press" to get stories not covered by mainstream papers. This great episode features numerous vignettes that reveal what might have taken place as the editorial boards discussed what to public in the African American papers.  It also showcased the issues of blatant discrimination that was prevalent in the country in the 1940s, especially for African American soldiers and employees in the war effort.  The show was written by Roi Ottley (who wrote over 20 of the episodes) and featured actors Canada Lee, Maxine Sullivan, Leigh Whipper, Clarence Foster, David Kerman, Paula Bowersmith, Randolph Eckles among others.  The theme music was from the great musician Duke Ellington.  I hope you enjoy this great item from New World A Coming.
African Americans on Old Time Radio:

Saturday, February 4, 2017

African Americans on Old Time Radio: Lillian Randolph on The Great Gildersleeve (1945)

In my third entry in my African Americans on Old Time Radio, I would like to celebrate Lillian Randolph, a great actress of both radio and the silver screen.  She is fondly remembered by many as Annie, the family maid in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946).  Around the same time, she was also working as Birdie on The Great Gildersleeve, program over the NBC Network (starring Harold Peary).  All told, she was an actress in over 650 radio programs according to the RadioGOLDINdex. Lillian was the sister of actress Amanda Randolph.

This year to celebrate National African American History Month in February, I am going highlight a new series on my blog.  This year, I will feature African Americans during the Golden Age of Radio - or Old Time Radio - during the 1930s through the 1950s.  I wanted to start this blog last year, but alas...better late than never.  I hope to have a great assortment of programs that showcase the great contributions of African Americans in mainstream radio when Jim Crow laws, segregation and discrimination were regular obstacles facing artists of color.

Visit to Old U.S. Mint (New Orleans, Louisisana)

Visit to Old U.S. Mint (New Orleans, Louisiana) - 2013 - There is a drummer in this story...honest!

The Great Gildersleeve is not only a great radio comedy, it has two aspects that really makes it a series way ahead of their time.  First, it was a spin-off program, having had its main character originally on a different series.  In this instance, the main character of Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve was originally on the Fibber McGee and Molly show. According to the Wikipedia entry (please see the link below), the character was introduced on October 3, 1939 (my birthday - not year!).  The Great Gildersleeve debuted on the NBC Network on August 31, 1941.  Second, the actor to play Gildersleeve (or Gildy) was replaced after a contract dispute.  Harold Peary originated the role and played Gildy until a contract dispute moved him off the show.  He was replaced by Willard Waterman in September 1950. Harold Peary would star in the The Harold Peary Show, often known as Honest Harold.

The Great Gildersleeve is the story of Throckmorton P. Gildersleeve - played by Harold Peary.  Gildy is the self-important Water Commissioner in their town of Summerfield.  A bachelor who was constantly on the look for that someone special, he lived in a house with his niece, Marjorie (played by radio great Lurene Tuttle) and nephew, Leroy (played by child voice star Walter Tetley).  They are joined by Birdie (played by Lillian Randolph) as housekeeper and cook at the home.  One of Gildy's great nemeses is Judge Hooker, who plays a nearly constant foil for whatever they are trying to do.  I have gone hot and cold on Gildersleeve over the years, but the more I listen to these episodes, the more I like them.  I love hearing the Kraft ads (from the early years) and I am trying to listen to more of them.

Lillian Randolph was one of the more prominent African-American voice actors from these days of radio programming. One of the big issues that many writers in the African American Media were concerned about was when actresses needed to learn a special dialect to play these roles.  Lillian Randolph was written up in a small article in the Chicago Defender  in 1950.


Lillian Had To Learn Dialect For Radio JobChicago Defender, December 2, 1950 - page 21
In order to get her first radio job, Lillian Randolph, who this year begins her 10th year as "Birdie," the cook for "The Great Gildersleeve," had to be taught dialect.
Lillian was born in Cleveland where she attended school and sang in St. John's Church choir.  Daughter of a minister and a school teacher, she left school at 17 for the stage and joined "Lucky Sambo's Show" in New York.  
In 1930, Lillian went to Detroit where she worked for George Trendle, originator of "The Lone Ranger."  It was here she learned dialect.
In 1935 she came to Hollywood for her first picture, "Singing Kid," starring Al Jolson.  Among her many motion picture credits since are "Little Men," "It's a Wonderful Life," "Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer," "Once More My Darling," and "Dear Brat."
When not working in motion pictures and rehearsing for "The Great Gildersleeve," Lillian makes night club appearances as a singer of novelties, blues, ballads, and classical selections.  She is president of "Les Dames," Los Angeles business and professional women's club which does philanthropic work for delinquent children and needy families.

In this episode, Judge Hooker is over for a family dinner - and Birdie is being complemented by her excellent cooking (along with her great housekeeping skills).  Leroy wants to the theater next week to see Famous Jones.  He is a "famous colored drummer".  Lillian shared with Leroy that she went to school with Famous Jones, who had that name long before anyone thought that name was appropriate.  Meanwhile, Marjorie wants to head off to study dance, but Gildy thinks she needs a more practical education. She needs to learn about house-keeping to attract a husband.  So he arranges for Birdie to teach Marjorie how to cook.  In the end, and for everyone's benefit, Birdie takes over the meal prep and once again saves the day.  This show was written by John Whedon, who is the grandfather of director and writer Joss Whedon and his screenwriter brothers Jed Whedon and Zack Whedon.

Teaching Marjorie Homemaking (The Great Gildersleeve - November 11, 1945)



Here are some links to programs relating to Old Time Radio and The Great Gildersleve:
African Americans on Old Time Radio:

Thursday, February 2, 2017

African Americans on Old Time Radio: Eddie Anderson's First Appearance on the Jack Benny Program (1937)

In my second entry in my African Americans on Old Time Radio, I am featuring Eddie Anderson, the great comic actor who was one of the key members of Jack Benny's show from 1937 until the end of its run.  He was known as Rochester, Jack Benny's valet.  However, he did not start that way.  This episode features his first appearance on the show in 1937 when there were almost no African Americans in national programs over the radio.

This year to celebrate National African American History Month in February, I am going highlight a new series on my blog.  This year, I will feature African Americans during the Golden Age of Radio - or Old Time Radio - during the 1930s through the 1950s.  I wanted to start this blog last year, but alas...better late than never.  I hope to have a great assortment of programs that showcase the great contributions of African Americans in mainstream radio when Jim Crow laws, segregation and discrimination were regular obstacles facing artists of color.

National Museum of American History (Washington DC) - July 29, 2015

National Museum of American History (Washington DC) - July 29, 2015

The Jack Benny Program was a national treasure and it is great that we have so many recordings.  Staring in the show was Jack Benny, a vaudeville performer who seemed to hit it big over the airways.  Mary Livingstone played second fiddle (no pun intended) to her real life husband.  She apparently had horrible stage fright, but hardly shows it as the straight person to many of Jack Benny's jokes.  Eddie Anderson played Rochester, Jack's valet and chauffeur.  He was one of the earliest African-Americans on mainstream radio and was one of the most loved characters on the show.  Don Wilson was the show announcer and did the commercials.  He was the constant butt of jokes, primarily about his weight.  Irish Tenor Dennis Day (who was on the 1948 show) also had a show of his own.  Besides being a 'dim bulb' in all the skits, he also sang a song on every episode.  Phil Harris (who also had a show of his own) was the bandleader and the joker on the show.  His real wife, Alice Faye would join him on the show as well.  The last big name was Mel Blanc (of Bugs Bunny fame).  Blanc (who ALSO had his own show) was one of the most famous character actors to play on the Jack Benny Show.  He is very commonly the floorwalkers for the Christmas episodes.  The shows are chock full of laughs, funny stories, corny jokes and great music.

Eddie Anderson (1905-1977) was a vaudeville actor, turned movie actor in the 1930s.  It was believed that his raspy voice was caused by yelling as a newspaper boy in San Francisco.  He was able to turn it a great characteristic that made him memorable on the silver screen and over the radio. While he started on the Jack Benny Program on this episode in a non-recurring role, his popularity got Jack Benny to think about another role.  Just a few months later on June 20, 1937, Eddie Anderson played his now famous role of Rochester the valet.

On March 28, 1937, Anderson played a train porter on his first appearance on the Jack Benny Show.  While his part was not that big, it was historic given the role that he would play in years to come.  Joining Anderson on the program were Jack Benny (of course), Mary Livingstone, Phil Harris, Don Wilson, Kenny Baker and Andy Devine.  Anderson's first line is "Yes, Mr. Bunny." which makes sense, because it was broadcast on Easter Sunday.

One year later, the Associated Negro Press story about Eddie Anderson was published in the Pittsburgh Courier (excerpts below):

Radio's Famous "Rochester"
Eddie Anderson owes his present position as Jack Benny's "air valet" to his ability to leave the dinner table.  The bewildering Rochester, who exasperates his boss with his laziness and larceny each Sunday night over the NBC-Red network, might have been a jockey rather than a radio and screen comedian with a string of his own thoroughbreds if he'd practiced a little more restraint at mealtimes as a boy. Because Eddie decided that he preferred second helpings to spurs and saddle, he deserted the paddocks for the footlights at the age of 13.

It was during his vaudeville days in the East that Eddie firsts met Jack Benny.  They just shook hands - nothing more.  But Jack remembered Eddie's name as well as his act, a fact which was to pave the way to Anderson's eventual selection as "Rochester."
A born complement to the Benny type of comedy, Rochester never has to rehearse a line twice.  He is one actor on whom Jack can depend for sure-fire laughs, and is never caught off balance by any of the boss' "ad lib" cracke.  Possessed of a remarkable memory, Eddie usually knows his lines by heart at broadcast time and seldom refers to his script.
A rehearsals and script sessions, Eddie is usually very quiet, pays rapt attention to Benny, whom he idolizes.  If Jack smokes a cigar, Eddie lights one, too.  If jack tooks perturbed, Eddie's brow wrinkles also.  During the rest periods, he can usually be found in the vicinity of Phil Harris' orchestra "truckin" on down.
 Radio's Famous "Rochester" - The Pittsburgh Courier (1911-1950), City Edition; Pittsburgh, Pa. (From the Associated Negro Press) - November 12, 1938, page 6

And about that first role on the show - here is an account from a few years later.

Rochester Van Jones Rides High
Radio and Television Mirror (January 1940, p49)

He wasn't "Rochester" on that show, - just an unnamed porter.  But Eddie Anderson got laughs.  And like all people who get laughs the first time in radio, he came back.  Once as an elevator boy; once as "Pierre," the western waiter in Jack's "Buck Benny" series.  Then Jack decided to build a house in Beverly Hills.  If you know the Benny show, you know right away that every halfway important act in Jack Benny's personal life is gagged to the limit for the air.  The house was too good for [writers] Bill Morrow and Ed Beloin to pass up.  "What would certainly make you look funny as a householder," mused Bill, "is a butler."
I hope you enjoy this great episode from Jack Benny .

The Train Porter (The Jell-O Program Starring Jack Benny - March 28, 1937)


Here are some links to programs relating to Old Time Radio and Jack Benny:
African Americans on Old Time Radio: